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  • Yolanda Bennett
    Guest
    Post count: 65

    This semester I have been teaching a Writing class for our HSE program and while I have taught this class many times in the past, I have always looked for new ways to address the learning needs of my students. The Universal Design adds a different perspective especially since most of our classes are virtual or hybrid. My class is virtual, and we meet one day a week, the other days students are working on their own. Because of this, it made sense to use UDL because I wanted to see better outcomes with in-class assignments. Students were turning in assignments on time as long as we were working virtually together during Zoom meetings, but individual assignments/homework have not been going so well. So, I decided to give students more options in how they can complete and submit their assignments. For example, they could follow the traditional way of emailing or submitting through CANVAS. They also have the option of setting up a Zoom meeting where they can present their homework to me one on one. This method has been most effective. I basically cut out rigid deadlines and told them work can be submitted during a time period that allows them to choose a day and time and they set up the zoom/WebEx meeting.

    I also use UDL in my supplemental instruction sessions with my nursing students. I begin each session, with a statement, “tell me what you learned in class.” This gives them the opportunity to talk about what they know and how they understood the lecture. It also allows for any misinformation or confusion to be cleared up before their next class session. I think students feel very comfortable sharing because they are not being graded and there is no right or wrong answer. I have also found they begin to ask each other questions to further their own learning which helps others in the session. I do think this is something that I will include in more supplemental instruction classes.

    Sarah Goldammer
    Guest
    Post count: 65

    Yolanda,

    Thanks for sharing! I love your open-ended question asking your students what they learned! Allowing them to reflect and to encourage them to ask questions, to take ownership of their learning, and to help others is so valuable. I am glad you are using this important step and that you have shone a light on it here. It sounds simple, but we all need to purposefully build in opportunities for students to reflect and to provide open-ended feedback. I hope you will also consider implementing the student reflection piece Tara and I are piloting. We would love to have you try it and provide us with suggestions of how we can improve this in the future.

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Reply To: In-class Assignments
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