Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • Todd Jorns
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    Post count: 28

    I like using Zoom for webinars, because it is free!

    Mary Beth Miller
    Guest
    Post count: 28

    Using the Breakout Rooms option in Zoom meetings (you must first enable through Settings) is the next best thing to in-person partner/small group activities. You can either let Zoom set up the participants in each room automatically, or you can assign the participants to each room. As the host of the overall Zoom meeting, you can visit each room to make sure students stay on task and/or to answer questions. Likewise, students can request you join their breakout room, to answer questions they may have. The tool is unbelievably simple, and emulates a face-to-face class in which you roam the classroom to see who needs help, and which students function fine on their own. For those who do not know how to get to Zoom Settings, it can be found at– https://zoom.us/profile/setting. Once at the Setting website, search for the option, “Breakout room.”

    Anita Kerr
    Guest
    Post count: 28

    Thanks for the reminder about Zoom breakout rooms – once students are used to meeting virtually in Zoom, I think this would be a great way to recreate class discussion, which we sometimes miss in online delivery. Thanks!

    Mary Beth Miller
    Guest
    Post count: 28

    I just attended the webinar, “Zoom Functions for Intermediate Users.” There was discussion on how to do recordings, and play them back. Additionally, there was discussion on freezing that occurs for participants– their video and/or audio. It was stated that this is a bandwidth issue vs. a Zoom issue. I agree. I mention all of this because there is a method to assist those students who face the freezing issue while viewing a video that the host is showing during a Zoom meeting. Rather than the host showing the video (their own, YouTube, etc.)– instead send the students the link to the video in Chat, and have the students watch the video. (Be sure to tell students to mute themselves first, or you will have classroom audio chaos!) The host then waits for everyone to view the video.

    I find that students who only have to go through one application to get to the video vs. the layering that occurs in a host showing a video that may be on YouTube, Blackboard, Canvas, have a better bandwidth experience. When a host shows the video, they are forcing the student to go through both the Zoom app layer first, then the video application layer (of YouTube, Blackboard, Canvas, etc.). This chokes off the student’s computer’s bandwidth capability.

    Finally, my experience shows those students who join Zoom from a Chromebook will have more bandwidth issues than those who join from a laptop or desktop PC. I have been teaching via Zoom since March. During a Zoom class meeting, I can identify by viewing the Zoom gallery view those students who are logged into Zoom via a Chromebooks vs. laptops/desktops. Without fail, those students that have logged into Zoom via Chromebooks will have audio/video freezing much sooner than the laptop/desktop users (usually this group have no bandwidth issues). Those same students who switch from a Chromebook to a laptop/desktop have much better results. Though for many of my students they are using a loaner Chromebook because they do not have access to a laptop/desktop.

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Reply To: Zoom Meetings
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